THE CONVENTIONAL CHINESE BEHAVIOUR


The Chinese have been known to be a civilization for some 3,000 years or more. As a nation of people they have not been known to have invaded another nation. If we take a leaf from history we would not fail to be of the realization that for thousands of years the people of the “middle kingdom” as it is more often than not referred to, have grown and developed a rich civilization. They have maintained a heritage on a wide range of matters which amongst others would include philosophy, exploration of the world frontiers, art, culture, tradition, language, science and most of all warfare amongst themselves.

The dynastic cycle of China has expanded and contracted on the basis of external invasion and the occurrence of civil strife or wars within the nation. The nation as a whole has had relatively little or few lengthy periods of peace. The Chinese history is basically littered with wars between Kings, Emperors, Warlords and Generals, who have endeavoured to be the Lion of the mountain.

During the entire period of its civilization, China may have only been invaded by Genghis Khan. More recently China has played a proxy role in the conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. The Chinese are always and to a larger degree concerned about the accumulation of wealth and power and are not concerned about politics.

The Chinese people wherever they maybe on this universe are not politically conscious. Their main concern is about their own “rice bowl” and consequently all other civil and social matters are on the lowest point on their list of priorities.

Should the political scenario turn to their disadvantage their motto is, to immigrate to another, country of their choice where they can continue to accumulate their wealth and power. That is why in some quarters the Chinese are referred to as the Jews of the East.

As Gavin Menzies in his Book entitled “1421 The year China discovered the world” inter alia states:

“Their science and technology and their knowledge of the world around them were so far in advance of our own in that era that it was to be three, four and in some cases five centuries before European know-how matched that of the medieval Chinese.”

Against this backdrop we can rationalize the current scenario of events of the Malaysian Chinese Association(MCA) as it has been played out in the various news reports that appear in both the main stream and the alternate media.

Since Malaysia attained Independence in 1957 the MCA leadership has never failed to have a cyclical, major leadership disagreement or dispute which is blown out of proposition and which inevitably results in the dismissal of a prominent leader or in the changing of the “guards.”

In the early days sometime in 1966 or so, we witnessed the removal of Lin Chong Eu which resulted in the birth of the Gerakan Party. Then in the early 1980’s we saw the late Richard Ho being removed which eventually saw Lee San Choon resigning as the President. Then for a short spell we saw an insignificant character helm the MCA until  Lee Kim Sai helmed the party until in the late 1980’s.

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After the 1987 operation “larang-larang” where a host of prominent opposition politicians were detained under the Internal Security Act(ISA) because of the dispute between Najib and Lee Kim Sai, which resulted in Najib wanting to bring down more than 500,000 Malays to bath Kuala Lumpur with Chinese blood, Lee Kim Sai was removed from power.

With the exit of Lee Kim Sai,  Neo Ee Pan took over the helm. This resulted in a power struggle where Tan Koon Suan took over the helm, until he was jailed in Singapore

Then we saw Ling Leong Sek taking over the helm in the late 1980’s until there was a power struggle in the late 1990’s or early 2000, where Ong Ka Teng emerged as the President when he decided not to contest the post in the late 2000’s and Ong Tee Keat took over the helm.

From the above scenario of the events it seem to be clear, that whilst the Chinese community as a whole are great entrepreneurs from which the United Malay National Organisation(UMNO) has tremendously benefited through the “ali baba” scheme of business connections, on the other hand amongst themselves they are basically belligerent.

There is no doubt that the MCA Chinese will find a solution to the current impasse. This is because of the fact that by nature they are able to see further than their UMNO counterparts. If that is not the case than why is UMNO even after 40 years of having the New Economic Policy(NEP) in place, still has the need for the NEP, as reported by the Star, where Najib at the party’s 60th. Annual General Meeting claims that those who have enjoyed the benefits of the NEP should not be calling for its removal and deprive others who still needed help, (to become rich in the ali baba way.)

Najib has also stated that “no one could deny that a large group of Malay professionals grew as a result of the NEP.”

It is only a matter of time that the political scenario in the MCA would be liberated, based on the conventional behaviour of the Chinese. But the question is, would the MCA at that stage be relevant to the Chinese community?

Or would the Chinese people who as the term describes them, “who live in houses without windows” would have by then disassociated themselves completely from the unproductive political activities of the MCA, as a large number of them have already started to immigrate to other countries.

Nevertheless the wise Chinese people have already started to wonder around declaiming their interest in the activities of the MCA’s foolish ways of playing politics over the last 52 years. Hence, the MCA has become the laughing stock of all right think people and has generally made a spectacle of itself as a political party in its entirety.

As Reinhold Neibuhr said: “The sad duty of politics is to establish justice in a sinful world.” So could it be that the MCA may not succeed in whatever may be its good intentions, as a political party. It may be possible.

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One Response to “THE CONVENTIONAL CHINESE BEHAVIOUR”

  1. boscopa Says:

    Yes. I am the author of this post.

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